Seven Stars

Java development environment IDE recommendations

Hello everyone

 

I am new to Talend DI/ESB/etc but I am not new to Java (albeit for an expert either), my apologies if this is too basic but I did not find anything on this topic.

 

It seems to me that any custom/advanced tasks inside Talend jobs often call for custom code.

And given Talend is a Java-ecosystem product it seems to me that Java is by far the easiest language to integrate with Talend.

 

Am I correct ?

Or perhaps Talend is language agnostic and any code (such as C#.Net or Python) can be easily integrated into Talend job and such code will perform on par with Java equivalent?

 

If Java is the best ecosystem to integrate with Talend and when you do need to write some Java classes/methods to be called/invoked from Talend jobs what Java development environment do you recommend?

Are there any plug-ins that make Talend-Java integration work better?

The Java editor which is inside Talend Studio seems to be rather primitive, is there anything better?

 

Many thanks

Tags (3)
2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Six Stars

Re: Java development environment IDE recommendations

Talend OS is basically a Java code generator that sits on top of Eclipse, which is a popular Java editor, so you might try that. Personally, I've had good luck with NetBeans. I don't know of any IDE that is specifically designed for working with Talend, although I wouldn't be surprised if there were user plugins available to provide some of this functionality in Eclipse, etc.

Talend is language-specific: to run C# or Python, you'd need to compile them into an external library, then call it from Java just as you would in a standalone Java program. In theory, you could write the part of the code that actually does the work in C#, then use a Java wrapper that interfaces with Talend, but I suspect that's more trouble than it's worth unless you have experience doing it.

David
Employee

Re: Java development environment IDE recommendations

As @DVSCHWAB said, if you have an equivalent library, or API in Java, then leverage the Java version of the library within Talend.  You can easily add your Java library as a dependency to a code routine, or in a tLibraryLoad.  In Code Routine, you can write static function like a facade pattern to your Java API, and then use those functions in talend everywhere where you can specify a java function.  

 

Talend do provide .Net components that can call .Net function within DLL.  But it is a hassle each time you need to marshal/unmarshal code from one technology to another.

 

If you want to build some Code Routines, you can do that in Talend.  For more advanced packages, maybe use Eclipse to build the jar, and then import the Jar in Talend Code Routines, or tLibraryLoad.

 

3 REPLIES
Six Stars

Re: Java development environment IDE recommendations

Talend OS is basically a Java code generator that sits on top of Eclipse, which is a popular Java editor, so you might try that. Personally, I've had good luck with NetBeans. I don't know of any IDE that is specifically designed for working with Talend, although I wouldn't be surprised if there were user plugins available to provide some of this functionality in Eclipse, etc.

Talend is language-specific: to run C# or Python, you'd need to compile them into an external library, then call it from Java just as you would in a standalone Java program. In theory, you could write the part of the code that actually does the work in C#, then use a Java wrapper that interfaces with Talend, but I suspect that's more trouble than it's worth unless you have experience doing it.

David
Employee

Re: Java development environment IDE recommendations

As @DVSCHWAB said, if you have an equivalent library, or API in Java, then leverage the Java version of the library within Talend.  You can easily add your Java library as a dependency to a code routine, or in a tLibraryLoad.  In Code Routine, you can write static function like a facade pattern to your Java API, and then use those functions in talend everywhere where you can specify a java function.  

 

Talend do provide .Net components that can call .Net function within DLL.  But it is a hassle each time you need to marshal/unmarshal code from one technology to another.

 

If you want to build some Code Routines, you can do that in Talend.  For more advanced packages, maybe use Eclipse to build the jar, and then import the Jar in Talend Code Routines, or tLibraryLoad.

 

Seven Stars

Re: Java development environment IDE recommendations

many thanks for your replies.