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Architecture, Best Practices, and How To's

Includes a troubleshooting guide.
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Securing TAC with SSL, and displaying Logserver events in Kibana when Tomcat is secured.
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Understand the custom libraries process.
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Overview This article shows you how to create a Salesforce custom object, then use Talend components to write and read data to a custom component.   Prerequisite To create a Salesforce custom object, you must have a Salesforce administration account.   Create a Salesforce custom object Log in to Salesforce. Click Setup in the top right corner. Scroll down, and on the left-hand side, select Build > Create > Objects.   The Custom Objects window appears:   At the top of the table, click New Custom Object. The New Custom Object dialog appears:   Click Save.   Create custom fields Scroll down to the Custom Fields & Relationships section.   Click New to create a new field. Select the data type for the field. For example, select data type text, as highlighted:   Click Next. In this example, you will create a field named acct_firstname. It is not required and isn't unique, so it can contain a null value. Enter requirement for the field name. Click Next On this screen, set the security level for the acct_firstname field. Select Visible for all profiles.   Click Next. In this example click Save & New to create another field, but if you were finished creating fields, you would click Save.   Choose the text data type for the second field.   Name the field acct_lastname. It is not required and is not unique, so it can contain a null value.   Click Next and set the field-level security by selecting Visible for all profiles.   Click Next.    Click Save to create the acct_lastname field.   Set permissions for my_account_object  Expand Administer > Manage Users > Profiles on the left-hand side.   Click Edit for the Profile Name for which you want to set the permission. For example, set the permission for the “Customer Support Team” profile:   Scroll down to the my_account_objects permission as shown below:   Select the boxes to set permissions for the group profile.  In this example, select all permissions.   Click Save.    Verify the my_account_objects permissions  Log in to the Salesforce workbench (https://workbench.developerforce.com/query.php) with the user login that belongs to the “Customer Support Team” to verify the my_account_objects permissions.   Since you just created my_account_objects and have not inserted any data yet, the query returned “no records returned”. Note: when creating a Salesforce custom object and custom fields, Salesforce will append __c to custom objects and custom fields. Example: my_account_objects__c for custom objects and acct_firstname__c and acct_lastname__c for fields. Use Talend components to write, then read, data from Salesforce custom object:   Verify data insertion in Salesforce my_account_objects__c by using Salesforce workbench:   Talend Salesforce components raise exception after running for a while This due to Salesforce setting a limited time of transaction, as shown in the link below: https://developer.salesforce.com/docs/atlas.en-us.apexcode.meta/apexcode/apex_gov_limits.htm   The workaround is to limit the transaction to read/write data to Salesforce.
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The configuration steps needed to successfully deploy and use CI Builder.
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Uploading to HDFS in advance will save a lot of time.
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Considerations when selecting a blocking strategy for data matching.
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Best Practices when managing Talend in a Hadoop cluster ecosystem.
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The "Ucache" command lists details of all connected users.
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Overview SAP is a popular ERP system that allows thousands of companies to store transaction data and Master Data in their SAP systems. Companies investing in Big Data and Apache Hadoop technologies want to be able to extract data from their legacy systems, such as SAP, and load it into Hadoop to provide transformed or raw data to their analytics teams; allowing them to draw insights from the data.       Environment Talend Studio 6.2.1 SAP ECC 6.0 EhP6 Hortonworks 2.6.4 Prerequisites  1. Set up Kerberos and get a ticket: Install the Kerberos client from the MIT site Update your security policies Configure the krb5.ini file Add big data nodes to the hosts file on the local system Get a ticket, as shown in the following image:  2. Configure SAP connectivity: Install the Talend function module on your SAP system Install the sapjco jar files from SAP on the Studio computer Create SAP connection metadata  In the SAP Connection window, click Check to make sure the connectivity works. If  succesful , the following image is shown.  Log in to the SAP ECC and make sure the MARA table has data. To do this, use the transaction SE16.   3. Config Hadoop connectivity:  In Talend Studio, log in to your project and select the Metadata menu. Right-click your Hadoop Cluster and click Create Hadoop Cluster. Select the distribution and version of your Hadoop cluster and select one of the options to load the configuration. Click Next. Enter the Ambari information and click Next. The system retrieves your cluster information and populates the remaining data.   In the Hadoop Cluster Connection window, make sure the services are running by clicking Check Services.     Build job Open Talend Studio, log in to your project and navigate to the Metadata menu. Right-click on the SAP connection and select Retrieve SAP table. Enter the SAP table name that you want to extract data from and click Search. Select the SAP table and click Next to review the schema. Then click Finish.  The table MARA will appear in the list of SAP Tables. Right-click on Job Designs and click Create a standard Job. Give your job a name.  Drag the MARA table into the canvas and the Studio will automatically create a tSAPTableInput component with the label MARA. In the component tab, enter the filter condition if needed. Drag a tHDFSOutput component from the palette to the canvas. Connect the two components using the row1(Main). Select the subjob in the canvas and click Basic settings in the Component tab. Select Show subjob title and enter a title. Drag the tHDFSconnection component from the palette and connect it to the subjob using an OnSubjobOk link. Select the tHDFSconnection component and, in the Component tab, change the Property Type to Repository. Select the HDFS connection you created. Click the tHDFSOutput component. In the Component tab, select Use Existing connection and select the connection from the drop-down menu. Enter a filename for the hdfs output file.     Drag a tSAPconnection component  from the palette and connect it to the tHDFSConnection component using an OnSubjobOk link. Click the tSAPconnection component and select the SAP connection from the repository.     Run Job From Advanced Settings on the Run tab, set the minimum and maximum memory settings. Click Run.   The following message will display in the Hadoop environment.                     
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Outlines the problem and challenges of MDM migration.
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Assumptions, prerequisites, and migration procedures.
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Two design examples provide guidance on this process.
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Set up a connected App in Salesforce, then a Job in Talend Studio.
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Create JobServers using a DI Job, then configure them in TAC.
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Creating a microservice and all the components of a deployment.
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How to set up Spark jobs in Talend Studio to utilize Dynamic Context.
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Setting up the tools, projects, and pipeline needed for Continuous Integration.
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Includes creating  a basic Chef cookbook.
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